millennials and smartphones

Habits are Shifting for a Generation Smitten with Smartphones

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Technology and Social Media Changes Life for Today's Teens

Millennials are quickly surpassing the baby boomers as the largest generation (they are already the largest population in the workforce) and we know that smartphones and data are an important part of work and play in their day-to-day. In the age of mobile first, social norms are shifting to accommodate the ever-present cell phone and the importance that the younger generation put on it. New research from Fido finds that millennials are much more accepting of when, where and how they use their phones and it’s becoming the new normal.

They rely on their phone to maintain their social and sex lives:

  • It’s all about sexting and socializing. Millennials are five times more reliant on their phone to maintain their sex life and 73% said they are reliant on their phone for their social life in general (compared to 32% of the older generation)
  • They are twice as likely to say that most or all of their social interactions in an average day happen via their phone

They love to stream and they send four times as many instant messages in a day:

  • The big screen is no longer king – 40% of millennials stream video on their phone at least a few times a day and 35% said the same about streaming music, compared to just 7% of non-millennials
  • Millennials send almost 4 times as many instant messages compared to non-millennials in an average day.

From breaking up to being in bed with bae, the younger generation are much more liberal with when and how they use their smartphones:

  • 28% of millennials look at their smartphones before getting out of bed, talking to their significant other, brushing their teeth or eating vs. 11% non-millennials
  • Over a quarter (27%) of millennials think it’s ok to be on their smartphones while in bed with their significant other compared to 11% non-millennials
  • Millennials are twice as likely to use their phone while on the toilet (69%), at the dinner table (42%) or in a meeting (23%) compared to the older generation
  • 80% of millennials think it’s acceptable to ask someone out through instant message (compared to 62% non-millennials) and more than twice as many millennials as non-millennials think it’s okay to break up with someone using the same method

 

The online survey was conducted among n=510 adult Canadians ages 18-65. The survey was administered by Rogers Consumer Insights and hosted by Maru/Matchbox, in both English and French between July 20th and 24th, 2017.

Source –  PR Newswire

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Eric T. Tung

Eric T. Tung is the director of digital communications for GoTo Marketers, a top-rated social media strategist and consultant, and dad. He has worked with some of the leading companies in the world on digital communications and employment branding, and makes a mean smoked brisket. Eric is based in Houston, Texas, and you can find him on most channels as EricTTung.